Accomplishments

Learn About Our Projects

Prior to founding Argall in 2017, director Andrew Gall gained a wealth of experience during his tenure at Felicetti and Kersulting working with some innovative architects, landscape architects and designers as the project engineer on a wide range of influential projects. Below are the profiles of a select few of those projects illustrating Andrew's diverse background of experience over a number of different project disciplines.

 
Image Courtesy of Maddison Architects

Image Courtesy of Maddison Architects

Image Courtesy of Maddison Architects

Image Courtesy of Maddison Architects

Image Courtesy of Maddison Architects

Image Courtesy of Maddison Architects

Image Courtesy of Maddison Architects

Image Courtesy of Maddison Architects

Image Courtesy of Maddison Architects

Image Courtesy of Maddison Architects

Image Courtesy of Maddison Architects

Image Courtesy of Maddison Architects

Image Courtesy of Maddison Architects

Image Courtesy of Maddison Architects

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Image Courtesy of Maddison Architects

Image Courtesy of Maddison Architects

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bastow-maddison-williamwatt-18.jpg

bastow institute of educational leadership

February 2009 to December 2011 - Maddison Architects

The Victorian Government funded a $15M project to restore a gothic school house built in 1882, to deliver a state of the art educational facility. The project involved a large amount of carefully designed demolition works, and the creation of a three level structure (including a six metre deep basement housing a lecture theatre) which was to be integrated into the 19th century double storey school house.


The retention system consists of bored pier and shotcrete walls, with the suspended ground floor and first floor slabs constructed from post tensioned reinforced concrete banded slabs. The remainder of the new structure superstructure was constructed from structural steel.


The project has incredibly challenging geometry and lines; hence the coordination of the structure and creation of the documentation during the design phase was an intensive process brilliantly led by Maddison Architects.


The main structural project challenges encountered were:

•Coordination of the design and providing advice with respect to construction methodologies to suit latent conditions associated with the existing structure post demolition.

•Coordination of the steel and concrete superstructure design to suit the project's challenging geometry, including collaborating with the architect and shop drawer during the construction phase.

•The design of the two way cantilevering post tensioned concrete upper level banded slab to suit the designated floor plate geometry.

•The design and coordination of the ‘central blade column’ with large slot penetrations that supports the majority of the upper suspended reinforced / post tensioned structure.


Role: Andrew Gall was the project engineer whilst at Felicetti.


2013 CEFPI Awards – Commendation (Renovation/Modernisation)

2013 AIDA Awards - Shortlist

2012 AIA Victorian Architecture Awards – Commendation for Public Architecture Alterations & Additions

2012 AIA Victorian Architecture Awards – Commendation for Heritage Architecture

2012 MBAV Awards - Commendation - Construction of Commercial Building $15m - $20m

Image Courtesy of Y2 Architecture, Photography by Peter Clarke

Image Courtesy of Y2 Architecture, Photography by Peter Clarke

Image Courtesy of Y2 Architecture, Photography by Peter Clarke

Image Courtesy of Y2 Architecture, Photography by Peter Clarke

Image Courtesy of Y2 Architecture, Photography by Peter Clarke

Image Courtesy of Y2 Architecture, Photography by Peter Clarke

Image Courtesy of Y2 Architecture, Photography by Peter Clarke

Image Courtesy of Y2 Architecture, Photography by Peter Clarke

Image Courtesy of Y2 Architecture, Photography by Peter Clarke

Image Courtesy of Y2 Architecture, Photography by Peter Clarke

Image Courtesy of Y2 Architecture, Photography by Peter Clarke

Image Courtesy of Y2 Architecture, Photography by Peter Clarke

Image Courtesy of Y2 Architecture, Photography by Peter Clarke

Image Courtesy of Y2 Architecture, Photography by Peter Clarke

Image Courtesy of Y2 Architecture, Photography by Peter Clarke

Image Courtesy of Y2 Architecture, Photography by Peter Clarke

the bendigo theatre project: ulumbarra

May 2012 to April 2015 - Y2 Architecture

Within the walls of Bendigo's Sandhurst Prison the Australian Government's Regional Development Fund in corroboration with the Victorian State Governments Department of Education and Early Childhood Development, the City of Greater Bendigo and the Victorian State Government's Regional Growth Fund invested $26M to build a commercial grade Performing Arts Centre.


The original prison cell blocks were retained and used as entry, foyer and gallery spaces. Seating more than 1000 people in the auditorium, the theatre is fully equipped with a full flying tower, 25 metre spanning roof trusses and cat walks and a five metre deep orchestra pit.


The complex also includes commercial kitchens, bars and lounges in addition to a another small theatre and dance studio. These spaces have been created by utilising a combination of the existing Sandhurst Prison structure and new, interesting and divergent spaces and structures led brilliantly by Y2 Architecture.


The main project challenges encountered were:

•Functionally and structurally understanding the requirements of the theatre consultants in conjunction with the language and concepts of of the architect, in addition to designing the structure to meet the specific loading requirements and scenarios of the theatre consultant (i.e. loft beams assembly, fly grid, lighting and loading galleries and catwalks, etc.)

•Dealing with latent and unfavourable soil / rock conditions as part of the excavation and retention system for the orchestra pit.

•Dealing with latent conditions / post demolition design clashes associated with integration of new and existing structure in addition to working within Heritage Victoria requirements.


Role: Andrew Gall was the project engineer whilst at Kersulting.


2016 A4LE Awards - Winner of Australasian Catergory 3, Renovations/Modernisations over $2M

2016 A4LE Awards - Winner of Peoples Choice Award

2017 Victorian School Design Awards - Winner of Best School Project above $5 million

Image Courtesy of H2o Architects

Image Courtesy of H2o Architects

Image Courtesy of H2o Architects

Image Courtesy of H2o Architects

Image Courtesy of H2o Architects

Image Courtesy of H2o Architects

Image Courtesy of H2o Architects

Image Courtesy of H2o Architects

Image Courtesy of H2o Architects

Image Courtesy of H2o Architects

state sports facilities project: victorian institute of sport

June 2008 to December 2011 - H2o Architects and Tandem Studio

The Victorian Government committed $60M to the State Sport facilities project to deliver new and improved facilities at Lakeside Oval and Albert Park for sporting clubs and the wider community. Completed in December 2011, the redeveloped Lakeside Stadium provides a new home for athletics in Victoria with the development of facilities for training and competition at all levels including an IAAF-approved eight lane running track.

The project included the restoration of the 1926 heritage grandstand and the construction of a triple storey building within which provides a new home for the Victorian Institute of Sport (VIS) and improvements to soccer competition and administration facilities for the South Melbourne Football Club in addition to a new grandstand and sporting pavilion elsewhere in the Albert Park complex.

The main project challenges encountered were:
• Design of the steel truss frame roof of the northern stand.
• Design and coordination with precast manufacturer and architect, of the precast concrete support elements of northern stand.
• Design of the independent structure to stand within the perimeter of the existing 1926 grandstand, working within the Heritage Victoria requirements for the grandstand and more specifically the eccentric footing design for this structure.

Role: Andrew Gall was the project engineer whilst at Felicetti.

2013 CCAA Public Domain Awards - Walls Commendation

Stage One: Image Courtesy of Urban Initiatives

Stage One: Image Courtesy of Urban Initiatives

Stage One: Image Courtesy of Urban Initiatives

Stage One: Image Courtesy of Urban Initiatives

Stage One: Image Courtesy of Urban Initiatives

Stage One: Image Courtesy of Urban Initiatives

Stage One: Image Courtesy of Urban Initiatives

Stage One: Image Courtesy of Urban Initiatives

Stage One: Image Courtesy of Urban Initiatives

Stage One: Image Courtesy of Urban Initiatives

Stage One: Image Courtesy of Urban Initiatives

Stage One: Image Courtesy of Urban Initiatives

melbourne zoo predators precinct stages 1 & 2

October 2013 to December 2014 and; January 2016 to Present - Urban Initiatives, OLA Studio and Arterial Design

Stage 1:
The Melbourne Zoo commissioned $5.2M for a new state of the art Predators Precinct to replace the Heritage listed Lion and African Wild Dog enclosure. The precinct encases a learning centre, a Philippine Croc (enclosure including a tank) and new enclosures for the Lions and African Wild Dogs.

With roaming landscapes, water features and a multi-function structure, the complex incorporated a combination of all material types and design and construction methodologies.

Stage 2:
The $9M second stage of the Predators precinct includes Snow Leopards, Sumatran Tigers, Coatis and Tasmanian Devils including around the existing lake in the north eastern corner of the Zoo. Set on a 5,000 square metre site in the North East wing of the Zoo, the project is centred around a watering hole - as that is the location where all predators come together.

The aim of the second stage (as it was with the first stage) is to design an engaging and truly immersive experience for visitors to the Melbourne Zoo to help people's understanding of the relationship between habitat, predators and cohabitation challenges in communities. Construction on stage two has commenced and is due to be completed in September of 2017.

The structures encompassed throughout the two stages of the complex were.
• Tensioned cable and mesh aviaries for the containment of various species of animals.
• Moat and tank water retaining structures designed for containment purposes.
• External landscape works including retention structures and footbridges.
• Steel and timber containment structures composed to contain variety of different animals.
• A multipurpose viewing and educational facility composed of a hybrid steel and timber superstructure.
• Earthworks and solider pier weir design works to remediate the existing central water body to meet the requirements of the zoo, our design team and the ecologist as part of our design team.
• Refit / reworking and suspension of imported shipping containers for both animal containment and viewing experiences.

The main project challenges encountered were:
• Working with our design team to satisfy the large number of user groups and stakeholders throughout both stages of the complex.
• Working with vets and animal handlers to assess potential loading to structures via first principal design required to contain a variety of animals throughout the complex.
• Incorporating existing structural elements into the new design to meet Heritage Victoria requirements.
• Formulating design solutions for foundations formed over areas of dense existing service conduits where penetrating the ground was unsuitable.

Role: Andrew Gall was the project engineer whilst at Kersulting.

Image Courtesy of BKK Architects, Photography by Peter Bennetts

Image Courtesy of BKK Architects, Photography by Peter Bennetts

Image Courtesy of BKK Architects, Photography by Peter Bennetts

Image Courtesy of BKK Architects, Photography by Peter Bennetts

Image Courtesy of BKK Architects, Photography by Peter Bennetts

Image Courtesy of BKK Architects, Photography by Peter Bennetts

Image Courtesy of BKK Architects, Photography by Peter Bennetts

Image Courtesy of BKK Architects, Photography by Peter Bennetts

Image Courtesy of BKK Architects, Photography by Peter Bennetts

Image Courtesy of BKK Architects, Photography by Peter Bennetts

Image Courtesy of BKK Architects, Photography by Peter Bennetts

Image Courtesy of BKK Architects, Photography by Peter Bennetts

Image Courtesy of BKK Architects, Photography by Peter Bennetts

Image Courtesy of BKK Architects, Photography by Peter Bennetts

Image Courtesy of BKK Architects, Photography by Peter Bennetts

Image Courtesy of BKK Architects, Photography by Peter Bennetts

split house, mount martha

June 2012 to October 2014 - BKK Architects

The Split House in Mount Martha is a really great example of what can be achieved when structural elements are incorporated into the aesthetic and the architectural language throughout.


The house comprises two relatively simple volumes linked by a splayed stair that also acts as a seating area for people to gather, listen to music and sit in the sun. Occupying separate levels that follow the natural contours of the site, the two pavilions provide a separation between the upper, main living/master bedroom zone and rumpus room/guest bedrooms below.


The structure for the house was comprised of a hybrid of steel and timber. Despite the complicated geometry of the structure throughout, the use of steel was minimised as much as possible for the use of timbers with much lower embodied energy such as laminated veener lumber and glue laminated sections. BKK led the project brilliant seamlessly working these timber sections into the architectural language of the building.


Role: Andrew Gall was the project engineer whilst at Kersulting.


2016 AIA Victorian Architecture Awards, Commendation for Residential New

Image Courtesy of H2o Architects

Image Courtesy of H2o Architects

Image Courtesy of H2o Architects

Image Courtesy of H2o Architects

Image Courtesy of H2o Architects

Image Courtesy of H2o Architects

Image Courtesy of H2o Architects

Image Courtesy of H2o Architects

Image Courtesy of H2o Architects

Image Courtesy of H2o Architects

rmit advanced manufacturing precinct

July 2009 to December 2010 - H2o Architects

RMIT commissioned a $15M refurbishment of the 2500m² Building 55 in Carlton (existing RMIT foundry teaching centre), to house an advanced manufacturing precinct to research and develop manufacturing techniques and create a connection between the institution with commercial manufacturers.


The refurbishment included maintaining a large portion of the structure to assist in achieving a five star ‘green star’ rating for the structure. This meant that the proposed new upper level was elevated above the existing structure with columns penetrating through the suspended ground floor into the basement.


The new superstructure was a cast insitu concrete frame consisting of reinforced concrete columns and a post tensioned band beam suspended slab. There were also structural steel mezzanines constructed within the super structure and a portal frame structural steel roof constructed over the superstructure.


The main structural project challenges encountered were:

•Initial design of combined eccentric existing footings in basement around existing structure.

•Ongoing redesign of super structure foundations to suit latent conditions after excavation.

•The structural design and the design of the construction procedure for works involving demolition of new window bays in existing external masonry walls.


Role: Andrew Gall was the project engineer whilst at Felicetti.

Image Courtesy of Nordon Jago Architects, Imagery by Binyan Studios

Image Courtesy of Nordon Jago Architects, Imagery by Binyan Studios

Image Courtesy of Nordon Jago Architects, Imagery by Binyan Studios

Image Courtesy of Nordon Jago Architects, Imagery by Binyan Studios

Image Courtesy of Nordon Jago Architects, Imagery by Binyan Studios

Image Courtesy of Nordon Jago Architects, Imagery by Binyan Studios

Image Courtesy of Nordon Jago Architects, Imagery by Binyan Studios

Image Courtesy of Nordon Jago Architects, Imagery by Binyan Studios

Image Courtesy of Nordon Jago Architects, Imagery by Binyan Studios

Image Courtesy of Nordon Jago Architects, Imagery by Binyan Studios

71-89 HOBSONS ROAD, KENSINGTON

September 2012 to Present - Nordon Jago Architects and Merbo Project Management

Development by Contract Control Services on their own existing Contract Racing site, the mixed use development at 71-89 Hobsons Road Kensington is spread over a substantial 6,500m² site and encompasses 178 apartments over four to six levels. The development also includes a café overlooking the Maribyrnong River in addition to commercial tenancies on Hobsons Road.


The primary super structure is a four and six storey suspended concrete framed structure encompassing post-tensioned concrete slabs, precast concrete vertical elements including cores, low height precast concrete basement retention walls, a suspended traditionally reinforced basement slab over Coode Island slit sitting on a driven pile foundation system.


The main project challenges encountered were:

•Initially designing a suitable foundation system to negate the 25m depth of Coode Island silt over a 10m depth of Moray Street gravels, and then coordinating the design and construct process with the appointed piling contractor.

•Coordinating the in-service design for the upper floors as it was fluctuating during the design phase while D&C piling contractor that was undertaking the first stage of early works.

•Liaising with the engineer on the neighboring site and resolving concerns they had with respect to the demolition of the existing structures on the site and working with them to address their concerns during the construction stage with respect to excavation against their existing structure and the construction of the structure's foundations.


The development at Hobsons Road is still under construction with construction expected to be completed in 2018.


Role: Andrew Gall was the project engineer whilst at Kersulting.

TWPZ Director Matt Fuller and the Hon. Troy Grant: Image Courtesy of Taronga Zoo

TWPZ Director Matt Fuller and the Hon. Troy Grant: Image Courtesy of Taronga Zoo

Image Courtesy of Taronga Zoo

Image Courtesy of Taronga Zoo

pride lands african lion adventure at the taronga western plains zoo

February 2016 to Present - Urban Initiatives, OLA Studio and Arterial Design

The Pride Lands African Lion Adventure exhibit is a $9 million project that will take visitors on a journey to Africa with an outlook offering views over the large 3.5 hectare open expanse where the lion pride will roam. The exhibit provides a village setting with free ranging goats and birds and interprets how communities in Africa live with a top order predator.


The new exhibit will also feature a new lion safari experience that will take visitors inside the exhibit for an exciting encounter from the safety of a purpose built vehicle.


The main structures within the complex requiring our attention were:

•Containment moat water retaining structure and filtration wet lands structures.

•Lookout structures formed sructurally from only plate steel.

•Lion containment barriers and holding areas.

•Timber and steel foot bridge / pedestrian transfer structures designed to fit into the surrounding landscape.


The main project challenges encountered were:

•Optimising the containment barriers to reduce cost while maintaining DPI containment requirements and the requirements of animal impact loads.

•Using computer modelling to assess the plate steel lookout structures to bring the architectural concept of the structures to life.

•Working with our designers to create a containment strategy throughout the containment and filtration water bodies.

•Provide an overall in-service design strategy that enables trades to work independently and in parallel to create flexibility and speed up how the exhibit can be constructed.


Role: Andrew Gall was the project engineer whilst at Kersulting.

Image Courtesy of Fusion Project Management

Image Courtesy of Fusion Project Management

Image Courtesy of Fusion Project Management

Image Courtesy of Fusion Project Management

Image Courtesy of Fusion Project Management

Image Courtesy of Fusion Project Management

Image Courtesy of Fusion Project Management

Image Courtesy of Fusion Project Management

111 inkerman street, st kilda

July 2013 to Present - Papapatrou Rice Architecture, Orange Building Solutions and Fusion Projects

The $11M Inkerman St development encompasses six stories above ground and two basements. The double carpark basement encompasses triple decker carstackers, the ground floor encompasses a commercial precinct with six stories of residences.


The main super structure is comprised of a post tensioned reinforced and traditionally reinforced concrete frame with a precast concrete core, blade columns and external walls. This superstructure sits over a bored pier / shotcrete retention system spanning two and a half basement levels some five to six metres into the water table.


The main project challenges encountered were:

•Dealing with a large amount of hydrostatic pressure in the basement by way of lateral retention and also uplift forces exposed on the floor and walls of the basement and car stacker pits.

•Providing an in-service solution composed of materials and construction techniques that were possible to be achieved on a site with relatively limited access.

•Designing the connectivity of the panels in the lift shaft core to transfer global stability loads and maintain a minimum thickness to satisfy the architectural set out requirements.

•Minimising slab thickness at transfer locations and dealing with non-typical floor plates, then later coordinating these transfer forces with the design and construct PT contractor.


Role: Andrew Gall was the project engineer whilst at Kersulting.

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